Monday, November 19, 2018

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Volvo S90, a sleek premium saloon – which replaces the largely forgettable S80 – is Volvo’s answer to the likes of the BMW 5 Series, Mercedes-Benz E-Class, and Audi A6. And it really will play the role of brand flagship. The look is reminiscent of the sleek Concept Coupe from the 2013 thanks to elements like the Thor’s Hammer daytime running lights integrated with the headlights, as well as the C-shaped tail-lights.

S90

It’s much like the XC90

The S90 shares much with its SUV sibling, including its Scalable Modular Architecture platform and powertrains.  Although Volvo has yet to release output figures, it did say that the sedan will become available with the T6 and T5 gasoline engines, the D4 and D5 diesel mills, and the T8 hybrid, all built around 2.0-liter four-cylinder units.

Pilot Assist

Volvo’s upcoming executive saloon will feature a semi-autonomous driving feature called Pilot Assist. But this system – which delivers “gentle steering inputs” to keep the vehicle in its lane – is now in its second generation, and Volvo says it no longer needs another car to follow.

Indeed, it’ll go about its business on the highway without inputs from the driver’s hands or feet at speeds of up to 130km/h. For comparison, the XC90’s system works only at speeds of 50km/h or lower. The S90, then, is clearly pushing the envelope in the area of semi-autonomous driving as the brand strides towards one of its stated goals: a true self-driving vehicle.

S90

It’s as safe as houses, just as we expected

If we were to spit out the word “Volvo” during an impromptu word association game, chances are you’d counter with “safety”. Volvos have always been among the safest cars on the road and the new S90 is no exception.

It picks up where the XC90 left off, boasting items such as Lane Keeping Aid, Driver Alert Control, Road Sign Information, Run-off Road Mitigation, Run-off Road Protection, and the City Safety package. Options include Blind Spot Information, Rear Collision Warning, Cross Traffic Alert, Adaptive Cruise Control, Pilot Assist, Distance Alert, Park Assist Pilot and 360-degree camera.

Volvo has yet to announce pricing for the S90, but it should be a tad more expensive than the S80 it replaces. For 2016, the S80 retails from $43,450.

Tesla’s commitment to developing and refining the technologies to enable self-driving capability is a core part of their mission. In October of last year they started equipping Model S with hardware to allow for the incremental introduction of self-driving technology: a forward radar, a forward-looking camera, 12 long-range ultrasonic sensors positioned to sense 16 feet around the car in every direction at all speeds, and a high-precision digitally-controlled electric assist braking system.

Today’s Tesla Version 7.0 software release allows those tools to deliver a range of new active safety and convenience features, designed to work in conjunction with the automated driving capabilities already offered in Model S. This combined suite of features represents the only fully integrated autopilot system involving four different feedback modules: camera, radar, ultrasonics, and GPS. These mutually reinforcing systems offer realtime data feedback from the Tesla fleet, ensuring that the system is continually learning and improving upon itself. Autopilot allows Model S to steer within a lane, change lanes with the simple tap of a turn signal, and manage speed by using active, traffic-aware cruise control. Digital control of motors, brakes, and steering helps avoid collisions from the front and sides, as well as preventing the car from wandering off the road. Your car can also scan for a parking space, alert you when one is available, and parallel park on command.

Tesla Autopilot relieves drivers of the most tedious and potentially dangerous aspects of road travel. Tesla is building Autopilot to give us more confidence behind the wheel, increase our safety on the road, and make highway driving more enjoyable. Is it so?

While truly driverless cars are still a few years away, Tesla Autopilot functions like the systems that airplane pilots use when conditions are clear. The driver is still responsible for, and ultimately in control of, the car. What’s more, you always have intuitive access to the information your car is using to inform its actions.

This release also features the most significant visual refresh yet of the digital displays for every single Model S around the world. The Instrument Panel is focused on the driver and includes more functional apps to help monitor your ride. The instrument panel provides a visualization of the road as detected by the car’s sensors, giving drivers the information their car is using for features including lane departure, blind spot detection, speed assist, collision warning, adaptive cruise, and autosteer.

The key differentiator in Tesla’s autonomy software is “fleet learning”. Every Model S that Tesla has built–even those not fitted with the necessary sensor hardware to implement Autopilot–transmits its travel data back to the company if the owner has given permission.That data now increases at a rate of about 1.5 million miles per day covered by the 100,000 or so Model S cars on the roads globally.

The release of Tesla Version 7.0 software is the next step for Tesla Autopilot. Tesla will continue to develop new capabilities and deliver them through over-the-air software updates, keeping our customers at the forefront of driving technology in the years ahead.

Videos :- CNET Car Tech & Car Throttle

 

 

img-1The most theft-prone vehicle in America might be the Dodge Charger. Or it might be the Ford F-250 pickup truck.

Those are the contradictory conclusions of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the insurance industry-funded Highway Loss Data Institute.

Still, the government agency and private group agree that the theft of late-model vehicles is on a rapid decline in the United States. One reason: automakers’ increasing use of ignition immobilizers, which stop thieves from hot-wiring cars. Nearly 90 percent of 2012 models are equipped with them.

In a report released on Monday, NHTSA said the car stolen most often during the 2011 calendar year was the Charger, with 4.8 thefts for every 1,000 cars produced in 2011. It was followed by the Mitsubishi Galant, Hyundai Accent, Chevrolet Impala and Chevrolet HHR among vehicles with more than 5,000 units produced that year.

Pickup trucks took the top five places in dueling rankings released today by HLDI, an affiliate of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. In first place was the Ford F-250 crew-cab with four-wheel drive, followed by the Chevrolet Silverado 1500, Chevrolet Avalanche 1500, GMC Sierra 1500 crew, and Ford F-350 crew with four-wheel drive. The rankings cover model years 2010 to 2012.

The Cadillac Escalade, long the most theft-prone vehicle according to HLDI, dropped to sixth place after GM reworked the SUV to thwart thieves.

“General Motors has put a lot of effort into new antitheft technology, so that may help explain the decline,” Matt Moore, vice president of the group, said in a statement.

Different methodology

The two reports produced separate results because of differences in methodology, Moore said during an interview. His group bases its rankings on a database of insurance claims, while NHTSA counts thefts reported to police.

Moore said large pickup trucks are also particularly prone to theft claims because owners can recoup the cost of equipment stolen from the flatbed.

Still, the two groups can agree on some of their findings — including that the Charger is stolen more frequently than most vehicles. While the muscle car did not make the top 10 most stolen models according to HLDI, the group found that it had 3.5 theft claims per 1,000 years of insurance coverage, or triple the average model.

Experts are not exactly sure what makes the Charger so popular with thieves, although the car’s ample horsepower might be part of the equation.

“If I were a thief I might be able to answer that better,” Moore said during a phone interview. “They’re powerful vehicles,” he added.

NHTSA says its preliminary data show that model-year 2011 vehicles were stolen that calendar year at rates 91 percent lower than the year before.

Steep decline?

In 2011, there were only 0.1 thefts for every thousand vehicles produced, down from 1.17 thefts per thousand cars in 2010. To compile the report, which contains statistics from 226 vehicle lines, NHTSA compared vehicle theft data from the FBI’s National Crime Information Center with production data reported to the EPA.

NHTSA says its latest findings mark a record decline in the theft rate. NHTSA data show that the nation’s vehicle theft rate has declined by an average of 13 percent each year since 2006, which was the last time the rate increased.

Terri Miller, executive director of Help Eliminate Auto Thefts, or H.E.A.T., a public-private partnership dedicated to the prevention of vehicle theft, was skeptical of NHTSA’s conclusion.

She said auto theft is dropping, but she would be surprised if it is happening as quickly as the report indicates.

“It seems like a very dramatic decrease,” Miller said.

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